Panama

This Week in Conflict in the Americas… February 16th-23rd, 2012.

  • President Caledron of Mexico reportedly unveiled a large advertising board near the American border calling on the US to stop the flow of weapons into the country on Friday.  On Sunday, a fight between prison inmates inside a jail near Monterrey reportedly killed some 44 people. On Monday, reports suggested that some 30 members of the Zeta drug cartel plotted with prison guards to orchestrate an elaborate escape that resulted in Sunday’s prison deaths.
  • The Governor of New Jersey in the United States rejected a bill allowing same-sex marriage in the state and called upon a ballot question to decide the issue a day after the state assembly passed it. On Friday, a 29 year-old Moroccan man was arrested in Washington DC as part of an anti-terrorism campaign, as he carried what he thought was explosives into the city. On Monday, the Obama administration’s plan to revamp the country’s nuclear weapons strategy and possibly reduce the number of warheads was leaked to the press, causing a major uproar among some conservatives who called the proposals “reckless lunacy”. On Tuesday, the US Marine corps discharged the long marine convicted in the 2005 killings of unarmed Iraqi civilians in Haditha, but will not face jail time. On Wednesday, several members of the Congress received mail threatening biological attack and containing suspicious powder, later found to be harmless by law enforcement officials. On Thursday, at least seven US soldiers were reportedly killed after two helicopters collided during a training exercise along the Arizona-California border.
  • Authorities in Canada announced plans to toughen their refugee laws to filter out fake claims from “safe” countries like Hungary, which it says are clogging up the system and wasting taxpayer money. Critics say it is an attack on human rights, as it appears to target the large influx of claims from Roma “gypsies” coming from Hungary. The country has also allegedly threatened a trade war with the European Union over the bloc’s plan to label oil from the province of Alberta’s vast tar sands as highly polluting. An indigenous community has launched a lawsuit against the government and a petrochemical company SunCor for failing to prevent pollution that has taken a severe toll on their environment and health.
  • The top court in Ecuador upheld a jail sentence on Thursday against three newspaper publishers who were also ordered to pay damages for libelling President Correa. Rights groups claim the ruling puts freedom of expression under threat.
  • The President of Haiti was reportedly attacked as he walked in a Carnival procession in Port-au-Prince, but escaped unharmed on Friday. Witnesses say that “troublemakers” were throwing rocks at the President and his accompanying motorcade.
  • National police in Panama reportedly broke up protests over plans for a vast copper mine and hydroelectric schemes, killing three men, wounding dozens and detaining more than 100 others.
  • Flooding rivers in Peru and Chile displaced people and turned up old land mines from the 1970s, resulting in a closure of the border between the two countries on Monday.
  • President Hugo Chavez of Venezuela announced that he must receive another operation to remove a lesion on his pelvis where surgeons removed a large cancerous tumour last year, but denied rumours that there was any metastasis. Chavez’s imminent departure for his surgery has reportedly thrown his re-election campaign into uncertainty.
  • Hundreds of relatives of inmates who died in last week’s prison fire in Honduras reportedly forced their way into a morgue in the capital to demand the remains of loved ones on Tuesday. The government announced that a dropped cigarette may have set off the fire, going back on the original claims of a purposely set fire.
  • A group of 17 leading intellectuals in Argentina criticized the government for supporting the right to self-determination of Falkland Island inhabitants, questioning the country’s claims on the territory.

This Week in Conflict in the Americas… December 9th-15th, 2011.

Hello all! Hope all is well!

I would like to appeal to readers to direct me to any English news sites from Latin America to help make this section better. If you know of any good news sites, blogs or organizations that profile human rights, conflict or peace issues from South or Central America, please write to me at apeaceofconflict@gmail.com or leave me the details in the comments below.

Thanks in advance,

Rebecca

 

  • Occupy Wall Street protesters in the United States have issued a call for thousands of protesters across the country to reoccupy public spaces to mark the movement’s three-month anniversary on December 17th. On Friday morning, the Occupy Boston camp remained in place, despite the deadline to move passing; Defense Secretary Panetta announced he would begin to talk publicly about the results of a strategic review to guide the Pentagon as it cuts hundreds of billions in military spending some time next month; a gunman opened fire on motorists in the heart of Hollywood; and the identity of the Virginia Tech gunman was revealed—though no motivation for the shooting was yet revealed. On Saturday, police evicted the Occupy Boston protesters from Dewey Square and arrested around 40 people. A new report on rape in the military demonstrates the difficulty victims face in trying to seek justice, amid claims that it is estimated that a female soldier in Iraq is more likely to be attacked by a fellow soldier than killed by enemy fire and that 37% of sexual trauma cases reported in the last year happened to men. On Monday, Occupy Wall Street protesters began a new “waterfront” campaign that aims to shut down ports up and down the west coast. On Tuesday, a federal judge temporarily blocked a part of a tough new immigration law in Alabama that would require residents to show proof of citizenship when registering mobile homes with the state; while a military drone used to monitor piracy off the East African coast crashed at an airport on the island nation of Seychelles. On Wednesday, the US House of Representatives voted in favour of a controversial legislation that would deny terror suspects, including US citizens, the right to trial and that could permit authorities to detain them indefinitely; while the US officially ended its war in Iraq with a ceremony at the Baghdad airport nearly nine years after it started; and the CDC issued a report that claimed that nearly 20% of all women in the US has been raped at least once.
  • On Wednesday, the body of a campaigner for indigenous rights was found the day after he was kidnapped in Mexico. On Sunday, one man was killed and nine others wounded after assailants tossed a bomb into a building where a cockfight was being held. On Monday, Mexican marines captured a founding member of the Zetas drug cartel, Raul Lucio Hernandez Lechuga in Cordoba, while a shootout just south of the Texas border killed 11 alleged gunmen and injured one soldier.
  • Cristina Kirchner was sworn in for a second four-year term as the President of Argentina on Saturday. Kirchner announced that she is intent on bolstering the country’s economy by promoting industry and consumer spending.
  • Bolivia is set to pass the Law of Mother Earth which will grant nature the same rights and protections as humans intended to encourage a radical shift in conservation attitudes and actions and reduce environmental destruction. The law redefines natural resources as blessings and confers the same rights to nature as to human beings.
  • On Saturday President Humala of Peru replaced his PM with a former army officer who was his instructor in the military amid fears that this could signal more authoritarian governing in the country. Some are concerned about the changes in the President’s political style, saying he went from a Chavista to a moderate leftist to a pro-business President and now a pro-military President.
  • Noriega has been returned to Panama following his extradition from France on Sunday. His critics have called upon the population to take to the streets to show their condemnation.
  • On Tuesday, Canada formally pulled out of the Kyoto protocol on climate change, only one day after an update was agreed upon amid international condemnation; while the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women has decided to conduct an inquiry into the murders and disappearances of hundreds of Aboriginal women and girls across the country over the past two decades that have faced a continued failure to take action by the Canadian government. A member of the opposition also expressed concern on Tuesday with the Conservative government’s agenda, warning that Canadians should worry that their rights will be trampled along with parliamentary democracy. On Wednesday, an MP in the House of Commons called the Environment Minister a “piece of sh*&” while he was responding to questions about the country’s withdraw from Kyoto– a sentiment I couldn’t agree more with at the moment—though he later apologized for his disrupting and unprofessional comment. A new report suggests that the dumping of sewage into a pumping station by De Beers helped to cause the recent housing crisis in the First Nations Attawapiskat community.
  • Brazil’s justice ministry submitted plans for a new disarmament drive to coincide with the 2014 World Cup football tournament. The government suggests swapping official footballs and shirts signed by World Cup teams, as well as free or discounted tickets for weapons handed into authorities, as well as possibly turning destroyed guns into goalposts. Many are less than satisfied, however, with FIFA’s entrance into the country, saying that their rights are being robbed by FIFA’s demands and massive public works projects that are tearing up their cities.
  • The President of Guatemala has reportedly apologized to the relatives of victims of the 1982 massacre committed during the civil conflict on Wednesday, in which Guatemalan soldiers killed more than 200 people.