Month: March 2011

Human Security Report Project- Afghanistan and Pakistan conflict monitoring

Dear readers,

I received the following email from the Human Security Report Project who are looking for feedback on their new website. Please check it out and be sure to let them know what you think!

Peace!
Rebecca


The Human Security Report Project (HSRP) just launched a new Conflict Monitors website and I thought this might be of interest to you and the readers of your blogs:  www.conflictmonitors.org


The Conflict Monitors provide concise and current information on peace and security issues in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Each Monitor is a comprehensive knowledge hub that contains the best available news, research, and data.  The Conflict Monitors website consolidates our popular blogs, the Afghanistan Conflict Monitor and Pakistan Conflict Monitor, and now provides interactive charts and maps illustrating trends in violent incidents and civilian casualties in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

The data visualized in the Conflict Monitors are from a variety of datasets and statistical sources created by organizations around the world. Here is a sample of the statistics we are presenting:

Civilian Casualties in Afghanistan

The Afghanistan Conflict Monitor presents statistics on civilian casualties based on data from:

  • The UN Mission to Afghanistan (UNAMA).
  • The Uppsala Conflict Data Program.

Trends in civilian casualties from Improvised Explosive Device (IED) attacks as well as the toll for humanitarian workers and journalists are also presented.

Learn more about civilian casualties in Afghanistan

Civilian Casualties in Pakistan

The Pakistan Conflict Monitor presents statistics on civilian casualties based on data from the Uppsala Conflict Data Program. Additional charts show trends in civilian casualties for a number of targeted groups including:

  • Humanitarian workers.
  • Journalists.
  • Government officials.
  • Religious worshippers.

Learn more about civilian casualties in Pakistan

Content from the Conflict Monitors is available through a variety of methods and I invite you to subscribe if you have not done so already:

  • Subscribe to eNewsletters or RSS feeds
  • Follow us on Twitter
  • Become a friend on Facebook

Hiatus

Hello all! Hope all is well with you!

I just wanted to get a quick note out to all the readers. I am currently living in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire, and because of the increased fighting as of late, our internet, phones and power have been intermittent. This has made it difficult to research and post, especially the This Week in Conflict reports.

So, I have decided I will be taking a break from posting these reports until the situation changes. I will try to still post reader submissions, shorter opinion pieces and other  information when I can get online.

Peace to you all!

Rebecca

More Canadian involvement in conflict minerals: Violent Attack on Peaceful Protesters Near the Marlin Mine

Hello all! Hope all is well!

My friend Rachel (who authors the fabulous blog under-mining Guatemala about mining abuses within the country) just posted the following blog post, which I had to share with you. Check out her fabulous blog if you get a chance.

Peace!

Rebecca


I received the following letter from Rights Action today concerning an attack on peaceful campesinos protesting the lack of compliance with a May 2010 order from the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights to suspend Goldcorp’s Marlin Mine, in Guatemala.

Below it, I have included 2 letters I drafted quickly in response. Feel free to copy-paste the first, and send it to Goldcorp (addresses included). Then forward it to the government and, if you like, include the second letter I include below.

URGENT CONCERN FOR SAFETY OF HUMAN RIGHTS DEFENDERS OF SAN MIGUEL IXTAHUACÁN FOLLOWING PEACEFUL PROTESTS
We denounce the human rights violations and abuses committed today against peaceful protesters in San Miguel Ixtahuacán, Guatemala.  The protest, demanding compliance with precautionary measures ordered by the Interamerican Commission for Human Rights regarding the Marlin mine, took place without incident during the day.  In late afternoon, participants returning from the peaceful roadblocks were reportedly confronted and attacked by community development council (COCODE) members and mine workers in San José Ixcaniche.
According to participants in the protest, Miguel Angel Bámaca and Aniseto López were beaten and threatened with lynching; one bus including approximately 40 men and women have been illegally detained and some beaten in the community of San José Ixcaniche.  As this alert is being written, they remain detained.  We are deeply concerned that the lives of human rights defenders are at risk.
Contact has been established with the local Human Rights Procurator’s (PDH) office, the local Presidential Commission for Defense of Human Rights (COPREDEH) and police, as well as national and international organizations to report these acts.
We ask you to stay alert and be ready to respond when more information and action requests are available from local organizations supporting communities resisting unjust mining in Guatemala.
In solidarity,

Francois Guindon – pancho@nisgua.org – +502 4014 7804
The Network in Solidarity with the People of Guatemala, USA
Cynthia Benoist – collectifguatemala3@gmail.com Collectif Guatemala,
France Jackie McVicar – jmcvicar@gmail.com Breaking the Silence, Canada
Grahame Russell – info@rightsaction.org  – +502 4955 3634
Rights Action, Canada/USA

Here are two letters I drafted quickly in response. Feel free to copy-paste the first, and send it to Goldcorp (addresses included). Then forward it to the government and, if you like, include the second letter I include below.

Send to Goldcorp CEO: Chuck.Jeannes@goldcorp.com

CC: Kim.Keras@goldcorp.com,
Tim.Miller@montana.com.gt,
Dina.Aloi@goldcorp.com,
david.deisley@goldcorp.com,
Jeff.Wilhoit@goldcorp.com,
Directors@goldcorp.com,
jamess@montana.com.gt,
lisa.wade@montana.com.gt

Dear Mr. Jeannes,

I am very concerned with the events I’ve just heard of, that occurred today near the site of your Marlin Mine, in Guatemala.

I understand that an outbreak of violence occurred this afternoon against a group of primarily Mayan-Man campesinos, peacefully protesting the fact that neither your company nor the government of Guatemala has yet complied with a May 2010 order from the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights to suspend Goldcorp’s mining operation.

Miguel Angel Bámaca and Aniseto López were beaten and threatened with lynching; one bus including approximately 40 men and women have been illegally detained and some beaten in the community of San José Ixcaniche.  I am deeply concerned that the lives of these individuals who remain detained are at enormous risk.

Whether or not your mining operation is directly linked to this latest bout of violence, the indirect link is clear, and I await your response on how you are mitigating this violent situation. Further, I am joining the chorus of voices within Guatemala and international who are calling for a suspension of the Marlin Mine.

Forward the above letter to Leeann McKechnie, Canada’s ambassador to Guatemala, who can be reached at:

karin.reinecke@international.gc.ca,
jennifer.chacon@international.gc.ca,
gtmla@international.gc.ca

CC:

info@gg.ca,
DMousseau@gg.ca,
HarpeS@parl.gc.ca,
cannol@parl.gc.ca,
kent.p@parl.gc.ca,
ducepg@parl.gc.ca,
laytoj@parl.gc.ca,
emaytowin@greenparty.ca,
ignatm@parl.gc.ca,
RaeB@parl.gc.ca,
LalonF@parl.gc.ca,
DewarP@parl.gc.ca,
bagnell.l@parl.gc.ca,
days@parl.gc.ca,
julian.p@parl.gc.ca,
SorenK@parl.gc.ca,
Allison.D@parl.gc.ca,
Marketa.Evans@international.gc.ca

Dear Ambassador Leeann McKechnie,

Please find below the email I have sent to Goldcorp, expressing my concern over the violence a number of peaceful protesters near the Marlin Mine faced this afternoon. They were protesting the fact that neither the company nor the government of Guatemala has yet complied with a May 2010 order from the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights to suspend Goldcorp’s mining operation.

Immediately following their peaceful protest, Miguel Angel Bámaca and Aniseto López were beaten and threatened with lynching; and one bus including approximately 40 men and women was illegally detained in the community of San José Ixcaniche.  I am deeply concerned that the lives of these individuals who remain detained are at enormous risk.

In addition to my concern for these individuals’ personal safety, I am shocked and dismayed by the failure of your embassy, and of the Canadian government at large to urge this Canadian company to comply with the May 2010 order from the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights.

I await your response on how you are working to ensure the safety of these  peaceful campesinos. Further, I ask that you join the chorus of voices both within Guatemala and internationally who are calling for a suspension of the Marlin Mine.

Sincerely,

Help is needed for IDPs in Cote d’Ivoire.

Hello all! Hope all is well!

This is an informal post, but I am hoping those of you with UN or other IDP agency contacts will heed these words and help to get rapid assistance for the IDPs living in Cote d’Ivoire. I am currently living in Abidjan and have been watching as civil war is breaking out all around me.

There are an estimated at least 30,000 newly displaced persons within Abidjan alone right now (and thousands upon thousands more across the country), because of fighting between different militias, rebels, and government forces during this past week. I have seen many scattered, sleeping out on the streets with their meager belongings as they have no where else to go.

These populations are now being heavily targeted, facing attacks from different factions. I have taken reports of some having their throats slit. Others being trapped within tires and burned alive. Many others still are being harassed, attacked, raped and beaten by groups of thugs from both sides, depending on the ethnicity of the IDP and the area they are in.

The UN has a mandate right now to protect civilians. Civilians are not being protected. There is a large contingent of UN troops stationed at the Golf Hotel, while the civilians are seemingly left to fend for themselves. These people need protection, some sort of “safe zone” for them to head to. Some sort of camp. Something.

The situation here is escalating quickly. If these populations are not protected quickly, I fear there will be many, many lost.

Hoping for peace for Cote d’Ivoire.
Rebecca